Day 9: Little parts are big deals

18 Feb

A couple of days ago I was helping with my daughter’s school softball team when I got hit in the back by one of her teammates.

With a bat.

And it hurt. Like heck.

The hit turned into a knot, and then it swelled and ached most of the afternoon and into the days following.

The injury wasn’t serious in the grand scheme of things (it missed by spine by probably an inch), and it didn’t look too disastrous (just a little purplish).

Still, I learned in the next days, that a small injury can hurt the whole body.

An ache in the back makes it hard to sleep.

And it spills into your sides and even into your arms.

And, oh, it gives you a serious headache.

The lingering pain I felt (and feel) reminded me of a passage from 1 Corinthians:

There are different kinds of gifts, but the same Spirit distributes them. There are different kinds of service, but the same Lord. There are different kinds of working, but in all of them and in everyone it is the same God at work.

12Just as a body, though one, has many parts, but all its many parts form one body, so it is with Christ. 13 For we were all baptized by[c] one Spirit so as to form one body—whether Jews or Gentiles, slave or free—and we were all given the one Spirit to drink. 14 Even so the body is not made up of one part but of many.

20Now if the foot should say, “Because I am not a hand, I do not belong to the body,” it would not for that reason stop being part of the body. 16 And if the ear should say, “Because I am not an eye, I do not belong to the body,” it would not for that reason stop being part of the body. 17 If the whole body were an eye, where would the sense of hearing be? If the whole body were an ear, where would the sense of smell be? 18 But in fact God has placed the parts in the body, every one of them, just as he wanted them to be. 19 If they were all one part, where would the body be? 20 As it is, there are many parts, but one body.

21 The eye cannot say to the hand, “I don’t need you!” And the head cannot say to the feet, “I don’t need you!” 22 On the contrary, those parts of the body that seem to be weaker are indispensable, 23 and the parts that we think are less honorable we treat with special honor. And the parts that are unpresentable are treated with special modesty, 24 while our presentable parts need no special treatment. But God has put the body together, giving greater honor to the parts that lacked it, 25 so that there should be no division in the body, but that its parts should have equal concern for each other. 26 If one part suffers, every part suffers with it; if one part is honored, every part rejoices with it.

27 Now you are the body of Christ, and each one of you is a part of it.

When I got hit by that bat, the pain in my back affected the rest of my body.

You know that this works with other parts of our body as well.

Ask, of course, a deaf person and he will tell you. A blind person will let you know how important sight is–and that other parts of her body is affected and compensates for the loss.

None of us, likewise, live in isolation.

The body has many parts.

And we–every single one of us–has value.

It’s pretty obvious that, in this day and age, we value certain people and their gifts, talents, or attributes more than others. We give the impression that certain people are more “important” because of what they do for a living, or what they look like, or how much they’re worth, or how they’re liked by others.

Every part of the body, and every person in this whole wide world is unique and valued, and we need to be acting like we know that is true.

When you hurt, I should hurt.

When you rejoice, I should rejoice.

(Mourn, mourn. Question, question. Laugh, laugh. Celebrate, celebrate.)

We should be in all of everything together, because God lives within each of us.

And He (as I often told my daughters, as they were going through puberty) doesn’t make mistakes.

He made us each with a purpose and a plan.

 

 

 

 

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