Day 15: ‘Write about something you lost’

24 Feb

Because I’m a little stuck this day, I decided to look online and see if I could find a website that provides random writing prompts.

I found one (actually, I found a whole lot of them) that had first line generators, plot generators, subject generators, and much more.

I picked the subject generator and it gave me this: “Write about something you lost.”

So, here we go…

———————-

I’m not Catholic, but I know that Saint Anthony is the saint of lost things.

I’ve even prayed to him a few times, despite my non-Catholicism. (I think Methodists can get away with things like that.)

You see, I’m a chronic loser.

Not a loser in the sense that I’m bad at things, or a perpetual sad sack, or a dejected last-teammate-picked sort of gal.

I just lose a lot of things.

Cell phones.

Car keys.

Important notes.

Purses.

Pens.

Cell phones (again).

I’ve even lost a daughter once or twice (when they were young, in the clothing racks at department stores).

I recall the time I lost my purse at Disney World. Replacing a debit card made the happiest place on earth a little less happy.

And I one time lost a pair of glasses, never to be found again. Being blind for a week was not very enjoyable.

And I’ll never forget losing that college paper the day before I had to turn it in. (This was, pre-computer-days. Written on a typewriter, thank you very much.)

Plenty of people might say that my pattern of losing things is a sign of my overall disorganization or lack of concern.

They could say that my losing things shows that I don’t value the things I have.

I like to say, though, that it means I have more important things to concern myself with.

Cell phones? Pens? Notes?

In the grand scheme of things, those things aren’t really that important.

They can be replaced.

(Okay. So cell phones and purses–which, usually, also contain drivers licenses and debit cards–take a little bit longer to replace. And daughters? Yeah, daughters are harder to replace too.)

So, yes, I have prayed to Saint Anthony before.

I’ve used this recommended petition:

I come to you with confidence; 
help me in my present need.
I recommend what I have lost to your care, 
in the hope that God will restore it to me, 
if it is His holy Will.

He’s answered swiftly on occasion (“Oh look! How did I not notice the phone charger underneath my pajamas?”), and and at other times the answer took awhile (“Great!  I find my house keys, NOW, after climbing through the window for four days straight”).

But the answer has always come, one way or another.

(Now, should we talk about my lost mind? or my lost loves?

Perhaps those are for another day.)

 

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